EvadeClip Status Update #5

October 14, 2016

Dear EvadeClip Customers:

We will keep this one as short as possible. We’ve started to receive many of the components and everything is coming together very nicely — we are pleased with the end result. We can’t wait to ship these out to you all as soon as possible!

We ended up having to make some tool modifications on the main body piece and received those samples this week. They have been approved and are in production.  There are two main items that are holding us up at this point:

  1. The pivot plastic piece is still being tooled. Since the glass break press-fits into the hole on this part (and nobody wants them accidentally falling off, right?) there will need to be some final adjustments — this pushes things out about 2 weeks.
  2. The cord saw is now being stamped. We were laser cutting these originally and while they looked pretty good, they weren’t quite as sharp as we had hoped. We kicked off a stamp tool so that we can get better teeth on those. We’re told that will take 1-2 weeks for the tool and then 1-2 weeks for production.

Given this, we expect to start shipping the first week of November and finish by mid-month for all open orders.

Address Updates — we’re going to keep it simple. I’ve you’ve moved and want to provide a new address or want to double check the address for your order please email us (team@tihk.co).

Again, we sincerely appreciate your patience this has been quite a journey making something so awesome. If you’re tired of waiting and would like a refund please email team@tihk.co and we’ll make the appropriate arrangements.


Justin (product designer) and the rest of the TIHK Team

EvadeClip Status Update #4

September 29, 2016

Dear Evade Clip Customers:

The past month has gone by much too fast as our product team has been scrambling to move the ball forward with the EvadeClip. Obviously, we are significantly later than anyone would have hoped since we got going but all things are pointing to a fantastic end product.

I know that many of you are eagerly awaiting your pre-ordered product and we sincerely appreciate your patience thus far. You’re going to have to wait several more weeks as we button down the final details. We fully expect to begin shipping out no later than the end of October.

The main hold-up at this point is the glass break component and it's been frustrating. We anticipated in the last update of having these by the end of September but here we are still waiting for final production. The process of getting production samples on this component has been very slow especially with this item coming from China (as we mentioned before, this is our only option for this component). Throw in the “Mid-Autumn Festival” where they didn’t respond to our emails for a week and you can see why we’re frustrated.

During that period of radio silence, we engaged a firm that specializes in sourcing and procuring components like these from Asia. The work they’ve done in the last week has been amazing and they’ve found a reliable source that will have them ready to ship from Asia around the 14th of next month with arrival the following week.

As for the rest of the components (all made in the USA), those are moving along well and the injection mold tooling for the main body components is being sampled and tested right now. There is a short production timeframe after we see samples next week on Tuesday.

As of right now, given no further surprises, we expect to have all the components ready for assembly around the 15th of October with the exception of the glass break coming the following week. We anticipate starting to ship these as soon as the glass break comes in and we can start to attach them. It is highly likely that we have all of the pre-orders shipped by the end of October!

Again, we sincerely appreciate your patience and are going to be including another extra handcuff key (Version 2) with each EvadeClip pre-order! If you’re tired of waiting and would like a refund please email team@tihk.co and we’ll make the appropriate arrangements.


Justin (product designer) and the rest of the TIHK Team


Ps. Now that we have a fairly firm schedule, we will be asking for address confirmations in the next week or so.


EvadeClip Status Update #3

September 01, 2016

Dear Evade Clip Customers:

I hope this email finds you well! We’re getting so close and can’t wait to get these in your hands. I’ll cover some main points as quickly as possible. See our last update for information on the design changes.



We were hoping to start shipping around the 12th of September but it looks like it will be closer to the end of this month (September). The main reason being the lead-time on the rod saw and the glass break components. These, unfortunately, will be coming from Asia (these items are no longer made in the USA) and that adds to the lead-time. All the other components are coming from the USA. We are hoping to have these by month-end and will keep you posted as to their arrival.



Once we have all the components we will begin assembling and ship them out in batches. We will be shipping orders out in the order they were received. It is unknown how long it will take for us to assemble and ship thousands of these. It could be days or a week or two. At this point I think it best that we don't speculate and provide more info once we have started shipping because we will know the real amount of time it takes then.



We want to make sure we capture any address changes as efficiently as possible. We were originally going to use a webform but now we’re looking into something that ties into our e-commerce backend. Look for an email for this mid-month for you to confirm your shipping address.


We sincerely appreciate your patience! If you’re tired of waiting and would like a refund please email team@tihk.co and we’ll make the appropriate arrangements.



Justin (product designer) and the rest of the TIHK Team

updated evade clip

Dear EvadeClip Customers:

Again, we are long overdue for an update on the EvadeClip manufacturing progress. After reviewing the prototypes we mentioned in the last update we decided that the direction was not a positive one for the product. While we had made it considerably smaller it did not feel like a solid product — it wasn’t the robust urban escape and evasion mini tool we wanted. It was decided that we should delay again and change the design.

Prototypes since the last update.

From there our product team had to go back to the drawing board. How do we ensure this is a small and durable product yet packed with the necessary features? Can we add the most requested feature of a glass break? Will this product last a long time?

After the redesign, the answer is yes and below we show a simple rendering showing how it works. The product lid opens up and various tools can flip out. By closing the lid you’ve locked in the tool and created a handle for easy manipulation of the tool. We’ve also been able to add a glass break feature (we’re testing an alternative location this weekend that may be a safer spot).

Animation showing features

So what’s next?

  1. We have our next meeting with the manufacturer Monday to start to finalize the schedule. We should be able to start shipping around the 12th of September if things go well but still need confirmation on all of the individual components.
  2. Look for an email by the end of the month with the final delivery schedule and a web form for updating your shipping address if you’ve moved.
  3. If you’re tired of waiting and would like a refund please email team@tihk.co and we’ll make the appropriate arrangements.

Again, we're sorry for the massive delays but everything is looking fantastic and we're excited with where we landed with the product.



Justin (product designer) and the rest of the TIHK Team

EvadeClip Customers:

We are long overdue on providing an update on the EvadeClip manufacturing progress. As of late we had been waiting for some sample units so that we could provide a more comprehensive update to you all. We’re still waiting on those and didn’t want to push this update out any farther.

But first, why are we just now getting production samples? Let me explain…

We want the EvadeClip to the be the final answer for an urban escape and evasion mini tool kit. After so much positive support with the campaign and extensive field tests with our prototypes we decided to redesign the EvadeClip. Don’t get me wrong, the EvadeClip was pretty sweet to begin with but the opportunity to make something good absolutely great was hard to pass up.

  • We made it smaller. By changing the form factor the EvadeClip will now be more discrete on your person or in your kit.
  • We made it stronger. This was especially important when using the saw. The rod saw now locks into position which makes it far superior to the previous design.
  • We made modular. You’ll have the ability to purchase different tools, picks and inserts down the road so you can customize your EvadeClip to fit your needs.
  • We made it looks so dang cool. We can't wait to show you what our industrial designer came up with.

So the bad part is that the delivery schedule is not what we originally hoped for. Depending on how the next round of samples turn out, we don’t expect to begin shipping till the first week of August or so. I expect we’ll have a more detailed update in the next week or so outlining the changes with pictures and video. At that time we will also be able to confirm the schedule. 

Not ideal, but trust me: this is worth it!

The team is currently working on ways to show our appreciation for your continued patience. More on that in the next update!



Justin (product designer) and the rest of the TIHK Team


If you are interested in lockpicking, you may from time to time see the disclaimer on a website that certain lock picking items will only be sold to “bona fide” locksmiths. The United States Postal Service, for example, considers lock picking tools non-mailable except when they are being shipped to a bona fide locksmith. The question then arises- what does “bona fide” even mean?

    “Bona fide” is a Latin term that literally means “good faith”. In the context of law it essentially means “the real thing, without the intention of defrauding”. A bona fide locksmith is, therefore, a real locksmith. The implication here is that the locksmith in question is certified to the fullest extent required by their jurisdiction. You may quickly find that this is still not enough information, however. The term “bona fide locksmith” is hazy and less specific than it could be, because not every state requires a license to practice as a locksmith. There is a wide variety of voluntary professional certifications available, particularly through Associated Locksmiths of America (ALOA). (Voluntary professional certifications like those provided by ALOA are not required by law to practice as a locksmith; rather they work to establish credibility among customers and professional peers.)

    The states that currently require licensing prior to operating as a locksmith are Alabama, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Louisiana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York City, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. Please do not consider this list exhaustive or authoritative, and do your own research before purchasing lock picking tools.

    It is worth noting that most states allow possession of lock picking tools by anyone. The issue of being a “bona fide locksmith” most often comes into play when discussing the transfer of said tools using the United States Postal Service. If you buy the tools in person or without using USPS in most states, you are not required to provide proof that you are a bona fide locksmith. Similarly, most online stores will not require you to furnish proof. Some require you to check a box agreeing that you are a bona fide locksmith before they will ship to you for purposes of their own liability. We recommend telling the truth and paying close attention to whether you can legally be considered a “bona fide locksmith” in your state, but among the recreational locksmithing community it’s agreed that there is a lot of wiggle room in this area when it comes to ordering products online for your own personal, legal use.

Questions to Consider As You Build the Perfect Everyday Carry

The items you choose to carry on your person every day are an extension of your identity and can reveal a lot about who you are, whether you’re a Type-A killer of to-do lists or you’ve locked yourself out of your car three times this month. Although the prepping/survival communities are especially fond of good EDC, you’ll benefit from putting some careful thought into your everyday carry no matter who you are. Read on for some thoughts to consider as you choose the best everyday carry for yourself.


What Can’t You Live Without?

While some items are nearly universal (wallet, keys, phone), the everyday essentials can also vary wildly from person to person. Do you reach for your chapstick twenty times a day? Maybe you live somewhere sunny and can’t imagine stepping outside without sunglasses. It could be an inhaler, a bottle opener, or a well-loved pocketknife. The core of your essential everyday carry is made up of whatever items you can’t get through the day without using. Greatest hits include (but aren’t limited to):

  • Keys
  • Cellphone
  • Watch
  • Wallet
  • Chapstick
  • Flashlight
  • Multitool
  • Pen

What Do You Do For a Living?

What does your occupation require you to keep on your person at all times? Obviously some materials won’t make it off the jobsite with you, but your job may still manage to influence your everyday carry. A paramedic, for instance, is much more likely to have an emergency CPR pocket mask on their keychain. Think about how your job influences the way that you view the world, and what you personally find is important to carry with you.

What is Your Fashion Style?

Do you require bling, or do you hate to attract attention? Maybe you pride yourself on a clean and understated look that screams sophistication. There’s no reason why your essential everyday carry- your wallet, your phone case, your watch- can’t reflect the vibe you’re trying to give off.

What is Your Philosophy of ‘Stuff’?

A minimalist and a, shall we say collector of things both need to carry a wallet, but the similarities end there. Some people won’t feel secure if they don’t keep every receipt from the past three months in their back pocket, while others don’t want their wallet to take up a width greater than a single credit card. Think about how much “stuff” you’re comfortable carrying with you everywhere you go and assemble your EDC accordingly.

What Do You Need to be Prepared For?

How does your job, your lifestyle and your personality influence the potential situations you could find yourself in? Individuals who travel frequently or often find themselves in seedy areas may feel much more comfortable with a hidden handcuff key on their person. Perhaps you work swing shift in an urban area and need to carry some form of self-defense, perhaps a can of pepper spray or even a kubotan. Maybe you’re a parent to small children and your pockets are just filled with wet wipes. Think about the situations that are likely to arise in your day-to-day life and consider how you can best prepare for them.

Need ideas? Check out the TIHK product line for high-quality everyday carry for urban survival.

For lock picking enthusiasts and survivalists alike, the legality of lock picks is a tricky subject. The good news is that in most of the United States and many countries around the world, the sale, transfer, and possession of lock picking tools is not illegal.

The Language of Legality

The language we use to discuss the legality of lock picking can be a breeding ground for misunderstanding, so let’s take a moment to clarify what we mean by some of the phrases we use.

Not illegal: There are no specific laws rendering illegal the sale, transfer, and/or possession of lock picking tools.

Prima facie evidence: The mere possession of lock picking tools is considered intent to break the law. It is illegal to possess lock picking tools in these states.

Must show intent: The mere possession of lock picking tools is legal; intent to break the law with the tools must be shown before possession of lock picking tools can be considered a crime.

A Note About Lock Picking

It is legal to pick any lock that you have received permission from the lock’s owner to pick. It is also legal to pick any lock that belongs to you. Picking locks that do not belong to you and/or that you do not have permission to pick is illegal.

Down to Brass Tacks

So let’s get down to it: where can and can’t you legally possess lock picking tools? The following states have laws that explicitly consider possession of lock picks prima facie evidence:

  • Mississippi
  • Nevada
  • Ohio
  • Tennessee
  • Virginia

If you possess lock picking tools in any of these states, you can be charged with intent to commit a crime. Whether you actually do intend to break the law is irrelevant.

West Virginia, Pennsylvania, North Dakota and Indiana have no specific laws about possession of lock picking tools. Therefore in those states possession is not illegal. The remaining 41 states all have laws rendering the possession of lock picking tools legal, with the inclusion that intent to break the law must be shown before the possessor can be charged with a crime. The language here regarding “intent” is deliberately murky, to allow for a lot of wiggle room among a wide range of possible scenarios. Your local law enforcement and governing body will have the final say on what constitutes intent.

The best ways to avoid running into a snag with the law are:

  • Only pick locks you are legally permitted to pick
  • Educate yourself on the specifics of the laws in your state
  • Abide by those laws

For links and further information please visit our Guidelines page.

If you're a professional who travels abroad often or otherwise find yourself in dicey situations, you need a rod saw.

What other device allows you to cut through almost any material with nothing but a small thin rod and as much time and patience as you can manage? A small rod saw, easily concealable on your person, and a little know-how is all you need to be sure that you can escape just about any restraint- from rope, to cord, to metal chain.

There are two primary types of rod saw available- carbide and diamond.

A diamond wire blade is simply a wire impregnated with diamond dust of various sizes, but don't underestimate its strength. The diamond dust enables the wire saw to cut through nearly any material: rope, cord, metal bars, chain-link, etc. Any material softer than the ultra-hard diamond surface can eventually be cut through with time and patience. A diamond wire blade will be more expensive for obvious reasons, but is more brittle and, with a thinner diameter, may snap.

What a carbide rod saw may lack (compared to diamond) in hardness, it makes up for with its overall strength. In addition to greater affordability, a carbide rod saw is thicker in diameter than a diamond saw, and much less brittle and less likely to break during use: a crucial attribute if you find yourself in a life-or-death situation.

For less-dense materials like rope and cord, a cord saw is your best friend. Quicker to use for lighter materials than a rod saw, a cord saw is equally small and concealable.

The keys to successfully using survival saws are practice and persistence. Get a feel for how they works with different materials and the best stroke speed and length for each before you find yourself in a survival situation, and we guarantee you won't regret keeping one of each with your everyday carry.

The world of lock-picking is complex. For the novice hoping to jump in, figuring out where to begin can be a daunting task. Let us make it a bit easier for you with this handy and simple guide to the 6 most common lock picks! Among them are the two most popular tools that no lock picking enthusiast should ever be caught without.

First Things First: Get Thyself a Tension Wrench.

This one is so essential it's not even part of the actual list. If you hope to use any other other popular lock picks, a tension wrench is necessary. The tension wrench is inserted into the keyway like a normal key, and is used to apply torque and hold the pins in place once they’ve been properly aligned.

1. Half-Diamond (Triangle) Pick

Fourth from left in the above picture, the half diamond can be used on both wafer and disc locks, for working individual pins and for raking. The wide variety of ways you can use a triangle pick makes it the most versatile pick; it's a must-have in every lock picking kit. If your kit has nothing but a tension wrench and a triangle, you have an excellent start.

2. Hook Pick

The hook is the most basic of picks, used only for working individual pins.

3. Ball (Round) Pick

The ball (also known as a round) pick has a full- or half-circle shape at the end, and is commonly used on wafer locks.

4. Rake Pick

The rake pick, also often called the snake, is the most essential pick next to the half-diamond. Rake picks are literally raked across all pins to bounce them up until they reach the sheer line. Raking is also known as scrubbing, and is performed by inserting the rake into the keyway to push up all pins at once; the rake is then removed quickly while turning the plug with the tension wrench, causing some or all of the pins to land in the correct position.

5. Wafer Pick

A wafer pick is a special picks made specifically for wafer locks, although depending on who you ask within the lock-picking community, some will argue that a wafer lock can be picked with a regular pick and doesn't need one that's been specially designed. Wafer tumbler locks are generally considered easier to pick than pin tumbler locks because the keyhole is wider, and the wafers can't be pushed too far in like pins can.

6. Warded Pick

You may know a warded pick by it's more common name- the skeleton key. A warded pick is used for opening warded locks, which use a very simple design: a set of obstructions (wards) prevents the lock from opening without the correct key. A warded pick has been pared down to its most essential parts (thus the term skeleton). opening without the correct key.

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